UKRAINE: Shche ne vmerla Ukrainy

The music for the Ukrainian national anthem was written in 1863 by Mykhailo Verbytsky, a Ukranian composer and Greek-Catholic priest. He set a patriotic poem by Pavlo Chubynsky, written a year earlier, which expressed the wish for Ukrainians to rule their own land. Verbytsky originally wrote the score as a solo song and later arranged it for orchestra and chorus. The first choral performance was given in 1864 at the Ukraine Theatre in Lviv. Widely sung around the country as the Hymn to Ukraine, both the melody and lyrics were similar to those of the Polish and Serbian anthems of the time.

Over the course of the years, various changes were made to Chubynsky's original words. Following the country's independence in 1991, after the break up of the Soviet Union, many Ukrainians felt that the lyrics were unduly pessimistic and while the Ukrainian government officially approved the Verbytsky melody, it did not approve the original lyrics. This attitude may have been influenced by political correctness but despite contests for replacement lyrics, none of the entries was accepted. Eventually on March 6, 2003, the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine decided to use the original Chubynsky lyrics with slight changes to the text. The title means, Ukraine's glory has not perished.

Mykhailo Verbytsky was born in Jawornik Ruski (now Mlyny, Poland) and christened in Ulucz, the site of the oldest wooden church in Poland, where his father was the local priest. In adult life, Verbytsky was a prolific composer who wrote music and orchestrations to hundreds of plays and musicals. In 2005, on the 190th anniversary of Verbytsky's birth, celebrations were held in the composer's native town. Several slightly different versions of the anthem are in existence, each with variations in melody and harmony. This arrangement is based loosely on the manuscript of a band arragement from the Kiev Conservatoire, edited by M. Skorik and E. Stankevich and orchestrated by O. Morozov.

   CLICK TO HEAR THE PIANO VERSION OF THIS ANTHEM (MP3: 890k).

Click on the yellow "PREVIEW SCORE" button below to see the first page of the score. Use the underlined links in the table below to download the instrumental parts in pdf format. I recommend you have Adobe Reader on your computer before you download the music, because this will allow the printed music to open automatically as it downloads. If you don't have it, you can get your free copy here. The music has been digitally scanned at 1200 dpi for professional results but the actual output will depend on your own printer settings. Always consult local expertise before performing an anthem in an unfamiliar country.



Kiev is an important industrial, educational and cultural centre of Eastern Europe. It is home to many high-tech industries, higher education institutions and world-famous historical landmarks. Kiev is also one of the oldest cities in Eastern Europe. The 11th century Cathedral of Dormition in Kiev, with its characteristic golden domes, was destroyed during World War II but has been fully reconstructed in recent years.

(Photo: Andrzej Hladi)



Instrumental Parts



These arrangements have been written so that they can be played by virtually any combination of wind instruments. If you'd like to see my suggestions for standard ensembles, e.g. symphonic band, brass band and so on, please click here. In theory, the arrangements could be also played by strings (which is why one part is available in the alto clef) but because the arrangements tend to use flat keys they will be limited to more experienced string players. The table below shows the instrumental options for each part. You may find this helpful if you prefer to "do your own thing" with the instrumental voicing to get an individual sound. You can just pick and mix from the selection below.

FULL INSTRUMENTAL SCORE

PART 1: MELODY LINE


Part 1 in C
In the treble clef but written in octaves, to extend the possible uses. Suitable for: flutes, piccolos, oboes, glockenspiels or other C-melody instruments such as violins

Part 1 in B flat
One tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: clarinets, trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns.

Part 1 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: alto saxophone, Eb clarinet

Part 1a in E flat
Minor third lower than concert pitch. Suitable for: solo Eb cornet.


PART 2: ALTO LINE


Part 2 in C
Same as Part 2 in C but written in octaves. Suitable for: flutes, oboes, or other C-melody instruments such as violins.

Part 2 in B flat
This part is written one tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: trumpets, cornets, clarinets or Bb soprano saxophones.

Part 2 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: Eb alto saxophone, Eb clarinet


PART 3: TENOR LINE (a)

Part 3 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. It is intended for trombone in stage band use, normally a little high for concert band or symphonic band. Suitable for: trombones.

Part 3 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns.

Part 3 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 3 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones.

Part 3a in B flat
One tone above concert. Intended for 3rd Bb clarinets in symphonic or marching bands but could be used by other Bb instruments.

Part 3 in C (alto)
At concert pitch in the alto clef. May be useful when arrangements played by strings.

PART 4: TENOR LINE (b)


Part 4 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 4 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns

Part 4 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 4 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 5: BARITONE LINE

Part 5 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 5 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 6: BASS LINE

Part 6 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef in octaves. Suitable for: bass trombones, contrabassoon, tubas

Part 6 in E flat
Octave and sixth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Eb basses, Eb baritone saxophone.

Part 6 in B flat
One ninth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Bb basses, Bb contrabass clarinet.

PERCUSSION AND TIMPANI

Each anthem is supplied with a percussion part that requires three players: snare drum, bass drum and cymbals. In all the arrangements, the timpani part is limited to three drums and generally percussion has been scored somewhat lightly. Of course, if you are playing as a string ensemble or brass ensemble, the percussion would be omitted altogether.

PIANO REDUCTION


This is a piano reduction of the full score and is intended to be used when the ensemble contains a piano, or when there are gaps in the ensemble. With the piano reduction, you can play this anthem as an instrumental solo, duet or trio. Anything!










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