TURKEY: İstikal Marşi ("Independence March")

Turkey (officially the Republic of Turkey) has the unusual distinction of being bordered by eight countries. It is also bordered by four seas: the Black Sea to the north, the Aegean Sea and the Sea of Marmara to the west and the Mediterranean Sea to the south.

Following the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the Turkish government decided that a suitably inspirational national anthem was needed that could act as an important symbol for the modern Turkey. A nation-wide competition was organized to find most suitable lyrics for a National March. The competition attracted over seven hundred entries. The winning entry was a ten-verse poem by the well-known poet Mehmet Akif Ersoy. It was unanimously adopted by the Turkish Grand National Assembly. Having established the winning text, another competition was then arranged to find a suitable musical setting. Twenty-four composers participated in the competition and a melody was eventually chosen by Ali Rifat Çağatay, which was officially adopted in 1921. A year later, the melody was arranged by Osman Zeki Üngör and his version has been in use ever since.

Osman Zeki Üngör, the son of a sugar merchant, was born in Üsküdar, Istanbul. Music ran in the family. In 1891 at the age of eleven, he was admitted to the Musical Academy of the Ottoman Imperial Orchestra where she showed exceptional talent as a violinist. He eventually became the leader of the orchestra and later, its conductor. He was the first conductor of the Presidential Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Turkey. Over the years, he conducted performances in Vienna, Berlin, Dresden, Munich, Budapest and Sofia. Üngör also helped to establish the State Conservatory of Turkey and between 1924 and 1934, served as its first Director. a scheme by which students with special artistic talent would be wholly sponsored by the government.

   CLICK TO HEAR THE PIANO VERSION OF THIS ANTHEM (MP3: 890k).

Click on the yellow "PREVIEW SCORE" button below to see the first page of the score. Use the underlined links in the table below to download the instrumental parts in pdf format. I recommend you have Adobe Reader on your computer before you download the music, because this will allow the printed music to open automatically as it downloads. If you don't have it, you can get your free copy here. The music has been digitally scanned at 1200 dpi for professional results but the actual output will depend on your own printer settings. Always consult local expertise before performing an anthem in an unfamiliar country.



The Golden Horn, the esturary that passes through the centre of Instanbul. The Yeni Cami (New Mosque, 1663) stands on its shore in Eminönü; the great Süleymaniye Camii (Mosque of Süleyman the Magnificent) looms above from the hilltop.

© Turkey Travel Planner.com



Instrumental Parts



These arrangements have been written so that they can be played by virtually any combination of wind instruments. If you'd like to see my suggestions for standard ensembles, e.g. symphonic band, brass band and so on, please click here. In theory, the arrangements could be also played by strings (which is why one part is available in the alto clef) but because the arrangements tend to use flat keys they will be limited to more experienced string players. The table below shows the instrumental options for each part. You may find this helpful if you prefer to "do your own thing" with the instrumental voicing to get an individual sound. You can just pick and mix from the selection below.

FULL INSTRUMENTAL SCORE

PART 1: MELODY LINE


Part 1 in C
In the treble clef but written in octaves, to extend the possible uses. Suitable for: flutes, piccolos, oboes, glockenspiels or other C-melody instruments such as violins

Part 1 in B flat
One tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: clarinets, trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns.

Part 1 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: alto saxophone, Eb clarinet

Part 1a in E flat
Minor third lower than concert pitch. Suitable for: solo Eb cornet.


PART 2: ALTO LINE


Part 2 in C
Same as Part 2 in C but written in octaves. Suitable for: flutes, oboes, or other C-melody instruments such as violins.

Part 2 in B flat
This part is written one tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: trumpets, cornets, clarinets or Bb soprano saxophones.

Part 2 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: Eb alto saxophone, Eb clarinet


PART 3: TENOR LINE (a)

Part 3 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. It is intended for trombone in stage band use, normally a little high for concert band or symphonic band. Suitable for: trombones.

Part 3 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns.

Part 3 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 3 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones.

Part 3a in B flat
One tone above concert. Intended for 3rd Bb clarinets in symphonic or marching bands but could be used by other Bb instruments.

Part 3 in C (alto)
At concert pitch in the alto clef. May be useful when arrangements played by strings.

PART 4: TENOR LINE (b)


Part 4 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 4 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns

Part 4 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 4 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 5: BARITONE LINE

Part 5 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 5 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 6: BASS LINE

Part 6 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef in octaves. Suitable for: bass trombones, contrabassoon, tubas

Part 6 in E flat
Octave and sixth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Eb basses, Eb baritone saxophone.

Part 6 in B flat
One ninth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Bb basses, Bb contrabass clarinet.

PERCUSSION AND TIMPANI

Each anthem is supplied with a percussion part that requires three players: snare drum, bass drum and cymbals. In all the arrangements, the timpani part is limited to three drums and generally percussion has been scored somewhat lightly. Of course, if you are playing as a string ensemble or brass ensemble, the percussion would be omitted altogether.

PIANO REDUCTION


This is a piano reduction of the full score and is intended to be used when the ensemble contains a piano, or when there are gaps in the ensemble. With the piano reduction, you can play this anthem as an instrumental solo, duet or trio. Anything!










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