GEORGIA: Tavisupleba ("Liberty")

Georgia is bordered by the Black Sea to the west, by Turkey and Armenia to the south, by Azerbaijan to the east, and the Russian Federation to the north. The area came under Roman influence in the first century A.D. and Christianity became the state religion in the 330s. At the beginning of the 19th century, Georgia became a part of the Russian Empire. After a short period of independence, Georgia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union in 1922. Independence was restored again in 1991. The country covers a territory of 69,700 sq. kms and has a population of 4.4 million.

In 2004, a few months after a popular revolt replaced the government, a new national anthem was adopted. The music was taken from an opera by the Georgian composer Zakaria Paliashvili. Zakharia Paliashvili is often regarded as the founder of Georgian classical music. As a boy, he sang in a choir and learned to play the organ. In 1887, he moved to Tbilisi as a chorister in the St. Mary Assumption Catholic Church of Tbilisi, eventually entering the music school there, where he studied French horn and composition.

Between 1900 and 1903 he studied composition with Sergei Taneyev at the Moscow Conservatory. Paliashvili later began to play a key role in developing national music in Georgia. He collected Georgian folk songs, co-founded the Georgian Philharmonic Society, and became head of the Tbilisi Conservatory. Although Paliashvili composed works for orchestra he is probably best known for his vocal music, which includes choruses and songs, as well as three major operas.

   CLICK TO HEAR THE PIANO VERSION OF THIS ANTHEM (MP3: 890k).

Click on the yellow "PREVIEW SCORE" button below to see the first page of the score. Use the underlined links in the table below to download the instrumental parts in pdf format. I recommend you have Adobe Reader on your computer before you download the music, because this will allow the printed music to open automatically as it downloads. If you don't have it, you can get your free copy here. The music has been digitally scanned at 1200 dpi for professional results but the actual output will depend on your own printer settings. Always consult local expertise before performing an anthem in an unfamiliar country.



The Tbilisi Holy Trinity Cathedral commonly known as "Sameba", located in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. The idea to build a new cathedral emerged in 1989. In May that year, the Georgian Orthodox Patriarchate and the authorities of Tbilisi announced an international contest for the project of the "Holy Trinity Cathedral." Eventually, the project of architect Archil Mindiashvili won. Civil unrest delayed the construction for six years and it was not until 1995 when the foundation for the new cathedral was finally laid. The cathedral was consecrated in 2004.

Photo © Ika Giorgidze



Instrumental Parts



These arrangements have been written so that they can be played by virtually any combination of wind instruments. If you'd like to see my suggestions for standard ensembles, e.g. symphonic band, brass band and so on, please click here. In theory, the arrangements could be also played by strings (which is why one part is available in the alto clef) but because the arrangements tend to use flat keys they will be limited to more experienced string players. The table below shows the instrumental options for each part. You may find this helpful if you prefer to "do your own thing" with the instrumental voicing to get an individual sound. You can just pick and mix from the selection below.

FULL INSTRUMENTAL SCORE

PART 1: MELODY LINE


Part 1 in C
In the treble clef but written in octaves, to extend the possible uses. Suitable for: flutes, piccolos, oboes, glockenspiels or other C-melody instruments such as violins

Part 1 in B flat
One tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: clarinets, trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns.

Part 1 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: alto saxophone, Eb clarinet

Part 1a in E flat
Minor third lower than concert pitch. Suitable for: solo Eb cornet.


PART 2: ALTO LINE


Part 2 in C
Same as Part 2 in C but written in octaves. Suitable for: flutes, oboes, or other C-melody instruments such as violins.

Part 2 in B flat
This part is written one tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: trumpets, cornets, clarinets or Bb soprano saxophones.

Part 2 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: Eb alto saxophone, Eb clarinet


PART 3: TENOR LINE (a)

Part 3 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. It is intended for trombone in stage band use, normally a little high for concert band or symphonic band. Suitable for: trombones.

Part 3 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns.

Part 3 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 3 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones.

Part 3a in B flat
One tone above concert. Intended for 3rd Bb clarinets in symphonic or marching bands but could be used by other Bb instruments.

Part 3 in C (alto)
At concert pitch in the alto clef. May be useful when arrangements played by strings.

PART 4: TENOR LINE (b)


Part 4 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 4 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns

Part 4 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 4 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 5: BARITONE LINE

Part 5 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 5 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 6: BASS LINE

Part 6 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef in octaves. Suitable for: bass trombones, contrabassoon, tubas

Part 6 in E flat
Octave and sixth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Eb basses, Eb baritone saxophone.

Part 6 in B flat
One ninth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Bb basses, Bb contrabass clarinet.

PERCUSSION AND TIMPANI

Each anthem is supplied with a percussion part that requires three players: snare drum, bass drum and cymbals. In all the arrangements, the timpani part is limited to three drums and generally percussion has been scored somewhat lightly. Of course, if you are playing as a string ensemble or brass ensemble, the percussion would be omitted altogether.

PIANO REDUCTION


This is a piano reduction of the full score and is intended to be used when the ensemble contains a piano, or when there are gaps in the ensemble. With the piano reduction, you can play this anthem as an instrumental solo, duet or trio. Anything!


















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