ESTONIA: Mu Isamaa

The Estonian national anthem has a similar history with that of Finland which lies to the north on the other side of the Gulf of Finland. The melody for the two national anthems is identical and was written by Frederick Pacius, who was of German origin. The Estonian lyrics were written by the journalist and poet Johann Voldemar Jannsen, a leading figure in the Estonian national movement at around the turn of the nineteenth century. The title means "My Fatherland". The melody was first sung at the first Estonian Song Festival in 1869 and it became popular during the growing national movement.

When both Estonia and Finland became independent after the First World War the melody was recognized as the national anthem by both nations but with different words. Officially, Estonia adopted it in 1920. During the decades of Soviet occupation, the Estonian flag and national anthem were forbidden, and those using them were sentenced to long prison terms, often in Siberia. However, the melody was broadcast daily on Finland's state broadcaster YLE, whose radio broadcasts could be received in Northern Estonia. It was thus never forgotten by the Estonian people. With the restoration of Estonian independence in 1991, the national anthem was restored too.

   CLICK TO HEAR THE PIANO VERSION OF THIS ANTHEM (MP3: 890k).

Click on the yellow "PREVIEW SCORE" button below to see the first page of the score. Use the underlined links in the table below to download the instrumental parts in pdf format. I recommend you have Adobe Reader on your computer before you download the music, because this will allow the printed music to open automatically as it downloads. If you don't have it, you can get your free copy here. The music has been digitally scanned at 1200 dpi for professional results but the actual output will depend on your own printer settings. Always consult local expertise before performing an anthem in an unfamiliar country.



Tallin is the capital and largest city in Estonia. It lies on the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland and is an important industrial, political and cultural center. Estonia has made significant economic progress since independence and it has become an important tourist destination. Most of the medieval city wall still stands, including the twenty-six characteristic defensive towers. It is seen here from Toompea, with Oleviste church in the background.

(Photo: Otto de Voogd)




Instrumental Parts

These arrangements have been written so that they can be played by virtually any combination of wind instruments. If you'd like to see my suggestions for standard ensembles, e.g. symphonic band, brass band and so on, please click here. In theory, the arrangements could be also played by strings (which is why one part is available in the alto clef) but because the arrangements tend to use flat keys they will be limited to more experienced string players. The table below shows the instrumental options for each part. You may find this helpful if you prefer to "do your own thing" with the instrumental voicing to get an individual sound. You can just pick and mix from the selection below.

FULL INSTRUMENTAL SCORE

PART 1: MELODY LINE


Part 1 in C
In the treble clef but written in octaves, to extend the possible uses. Suitable for: flutes, piccolos, oboes, glockenspiels or other C-melody instruments such as violins

Part 1 in B flat
One tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: clarinets, trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns.

Part 1 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: alto saxophone, Eb clarinet

Part 1a in E flat
Minor third lower than concert pitch. Suitable for: solo Eb cornet.


PART 2: ALTO LINE


Part 2 in C
Same as Part 2 in C but written in octaves. Suitable for: flutes, oboes, or other C-melody instruments such as violins.

Part 2 in B flat
This part is written one tone higher than concert pitch. Suitable for: trumpets, cornets, clarinets or Bb soprano saxophones.

Part 2 in E flat
Major sixth above concert pitch. Suitable for: Eb alto saxophone, Eb clarinet


PART 3: TENOR LINE (a)

Part 3 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. It is intended for trombone in stage band use, normally a little high for concert band or symphonic band. Suitable for: trombones.

Part 3 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns.

Part 3 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 3 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones.

Part 3a in B flat
One tone above concert. Intended for 3rd Bb clarinets in symphonic or marching bands but could be used by other Bb instruments.

Part 3 in C (alto)
At concert pitch in the alto clef. May be useful when arrangements played by strings.

PART 4: TENOR LINE (b)


Part 4 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 4 in F
One fifth higher that concert. Suitable for: French horns

Part 4 in E flat
One sixth higher than concert. Suitable for: Eb tenor horns or alto saxophones.

Part 4 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 5: BARITONE LINE

Part 5 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef. Suitable for: trombones, bassoons.

Part 5 in B flat
One ninth above concert. Suitable for: Bb tenor saxophones, Bb baritones, euphoniums.

PART 6: BASS LINE

Part 6 in C
At concert pitch in the bass clef in octaves. Suitable for: bass trombones, contrabassoon, tubas

Part 6 in E flat
Octave and sixth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Eb basses, Eb baritone saxophone.

Part 6 in B flat
One ninth higher than concert in treble clef. Suitable for: Bb basses, Bb contrabass clarinet.

PERCUSSION AND TIMPANI

Each anthem is supplied with a percussion part that requires three players: snare drum, bass drum and cymbals. In all the arrangements, the timpani part is limited to three drums and generally percussion has been scored somewhat lightly. Of course, if you are playing as a string ensemble or brass ensemble, the percussion would be omitted altogether.

PIANO REDUCTION


This is a piano reduction of the full score and is intended to be used when the ensemble contains a piano, or when there are gaps in the ensemble. With the piano reduction, you can play this anthem as an instrumental solo, duet or trio. Anything!


Finally, the list above is intended to show the wide range of possibilities. If you have a non-standard ensemble, you may need to experiment a little with the voicings to get the sound you want. Remember that Part 5 is not essential so if you miss it out entirely, there will be no problem.







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